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November 06, 2006

Comments

Ali

I sympathize. We are lucky, there is a state owned island in the Kennebec River in our town that is an uninhabited wildlife preserve, and we often see deer on the island, and in the winter, crossing to and fro over the ice. As yet, they have stayed away from my yard, but I'm sure there will come a day....

As for your deck and the deer...a few years ago I was visiting a friend vacationing on Peaks Island just off Portland in Casco bay, Maine, and observed firsdt hand the island deer browsing from window boxes and porch planters all over the island in the middle of the day --and this was the year after they had a sharpshooter reduce the population by half!

Good Luck!!!
Ali

Talbin

Ali: You are lucky. We have an extremely large park system just to our west, but the deer are still a problem. One of our biggest issues is that the little neighborhood I live in - about 25 acres - is completely wooded, with fewer than one house per acre. I know where the deer sleep! I just didn't think they would be quite so brazen as to walk up steps and across a pretty large deck. I should have taken my cue from the hostas that were munched right next to the front door.

Annie in Austin

We moved from one Austin house to another two years ago, and so far, the deer haven't come here.

At the last house we had steps leading up to decks and yes, the deer could climb those stairs. We had to add gates to keep them from eating all the deck plants. [And then remember to shut the gates!]

The deer loved to walk up the front porch steps, stand on back legs, with front feet balanced on the porch columns, so they could reach up higher and eat everything out of the hanging baskets.

Annie

Talbin

Annie: You're lucky so far in Austin! I think next spring we're going to have to do what you did in your old house - construct a gate and attach the deer fence to it. I'm just not willing to give up on my veggies yet!

And as for eating your baskets - they regularly eat out of our bird feeders. Last year I watched a doe with triplets teach them how to do it. Now the bird feeder sits empty, because if I move it any higher I can't get to it, but if I fill it as-is, the deer will clean it out in one night.

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